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Build Your Rainy Day Fund

Like an emergency fund, it can come in handy.

Sometimes, life gets expensive. A little bad luck or a twist of fate can hit us right in the checkbook and challenge us to live within our budget.

An emergency fund may help us handle major financial disruptions. For the minor ones, a rainy day fund may suffice.

A rainy day fund and an emergency fund differ in scale, but not purpose. Both funds are designed to fully or partly absorb sudden costs. An emergency fund contains enough cash to help a household through a sudden financial crisis: a serious illness, a job loss. A rainy day fund is built in anticipation of certain expenses, rather than as a response to unforeseen emergencies. It may be created just to deal with one probable future expense.

As an example, think of a couple living in a desert community not far from a normally shallow or dry creek. Most years, the creek is no bother – but in two of the past 12 years, summer monsoons have caused the creek to swell, with a little water creeping into their backyard, patio, and kitchen on both occasions. Wisely, they start a rainy day fund to deal with the potential expenses that could arise from that impending rainy day.

Rainy day funds can address all kinds of financial inconveniences. Cars need service and repair; a rainy day fund dedicated to auto maintenance may help allay costs. Dental work can become expensive. So can veterinary bills. College textbooks seem to be pricier each year.

A rainy day fund can be built gradually, if preferred. Think $20 or $50 a month. Or, you can devote a lump sum to one. The cash can go into a savings account, a money market account that gives you the ability to write checks, or an interest-bearing checking account.

How about an investment account or a certificate of deposit? That idea could have more downside than upside. A rainy day fund is not only about saving money, but easily accessing it. A CD gives you the chance to grow your invested assets, but if you want to quickly withdraw those assets, you may end up with a loss stemming from an early withdrawal penalty. Similarly, you could end up withdrawing less from a brokerage account than you put into it, due to investment underperformance.1

Newly revised data from the Bureau of Economic Analysis shows that Americans saved 6.7% of their incomes during 2016-17. This is encouraging. It suggests that consumers are being prudent, building cash reserves for both financially sunny and rainy days.2

 

Citations.
1 – studentloanhero.com/featured/times-cd-work-for-your-savings/ [7/10/18]
2 – bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-07-27/americans-have-been-saving-much-more-than-thought-new-data-show [7/27/18]

This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. All economic and performance data is historical and not indicative of future results. Market indices discussed are unmanaged. Investors cannot invest in unmanaged indices. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This material was prepared by MarketingLibrary.Net Inc., for Mark Lund, Mark is known as a Wealth Advisor, The 401k Advisor, Investor Coach, The Financial Advisor, The Financial Planner and author of The Effective Investor. Mark offers investment advisory services through Stonecreek Wealth Advisors, Inc. a fiduciary, independent, fee-only, Registered Investment Advisor firm providing investment and retirement planning for individuals and 401k consulting for small businesses. Cities served include but not limited to are: Park City, Salt Lake City, Murray City, West Jordan City, Sandy City, Draper City, South Jordan City, Provo City, Orem City, Lehi City, Highland City, Alpine City, and American Fork City in Utah.

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About the Author ()

Mark K. Lund is the firm's founder, CEO and author of The Effective Investor, a #1 Best Seller. He has written articles for or been quoted in: The Wall Street Journal, The Salt Lake Tribune, The Enterprise Newspaper, The Utah Business Connect Magazine, US News & World Report, and Newsmax.com, just to name a few.  Mark publishes two newsletters called, “The Mark Lund Growth Report” and “Mark Lund on Money.”  Mark provides CPE (continuing professional education) courses for CPAs.  You may also have seen him on KUTV Channel 2, or as a guest speaker at a local association or business. Mark provides investment and retirement planning services for individuals and 401(k) consulting for small businesses. In his book, The Effective Investor, Mark exposes the false narrative magazines, media, big Wall Street firms, and most advisors want you to believe. The good news is that Mark will show you that you don’t need their speculative ways of investing in order to be successful. Get a free copy when you schedule your initial consultation.

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